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5 Ways To Fix A Shower Diverter Pull-Up

If your bathtub has a showerhead, your shower valve redirects water from the showerhead to the tub faucet. When it’s not working, water simultaneously pours from both outlets. It’s easy to fix, so let’s learn how. Shower valves have two parts:

  • A tub spout for filling the tub.
  • A diverter gate – the little knob you twist, turn, or pull to direct your water.

The most common diverter types are:

  • Tee-valve – a single faucet with a pull-up knob
  • Two-valve – one faucet with a knob that turns water hot or cold
  • Three-valve – two faucets, one for hot water and one for cold

Option 1 – Clean Your Spout

Clean your spout

Sometimes, the diverter gate gets stuck. When you try to turn it or pull it up, it refuses to budge or makes squeaky, grating noises. If you do manage to pull it up, it may stick at the top and refuse to push back down. This is probably due to accumulated dirt, grease, and limescale.

  • Step 1: Mix a batch of white vinegar. It has to be enough to completely cover the spout.
  • Step 2: Pour your vinegar into a plastic bag. If you like, you can mix the vinegar with water.
  • Step 3: Wrap the plastic bag around your spout, submerging the spout.
  • Step 4: Hold the bag in place using a rubber band, string, or shoe lace.
  • Step 5: Leave the faucet submerged for three or four days, checking it once a day.
  • Step 6: Once the spout looks clean and shiny again, pull the diverter gate to see if it works.

Cleaning your spout with vinegar is good for the environment, because vinegar is organic and non-toxic, unlike harsh bathroom cleaners. It also saves you the cost of buying replacement parts, so it’s a pocket-friendly way to fix your shower leak.

Option 2 – Loosen Your Diverter With Cooking Spray

Loosen your diverter with cooking spray

If your diverter gate stays stubborn after your vinegar soak, try using a lubricant to make it work better. Any cooking spray will do, and you probably have some in the kitchen.

 

 

  • Step 1: Pull the diverter knob up and down a few times to loosen it.
  • Step 2: Apply some cooking spray to lubricate the knob.
  • Step 3: Try pulling it up and down again. Spray a few more times if you need to.
  • Step 4: Wipe away any excess spray and wash the oil off the bathtub.

Always use cooking spray instead of hair spray or wax. The latter two products have ingredients that could be corrosive and might damage the metal and plastic parts of your shower.

Option 3 – Soak The Whole Spout

Soak the whole spout

Your vinegar wash will only clean the visible parts of your spout. When you want to stop your handheld showerhead from leaking, you need to clean the inner parts of your diverter gate.

  • Step 1: Turn off your water supply from the main spigot. This prevents flooding.
  • Step 2: Inspect your spout to see how it’s attached to the wall. There are three common styles:
    • A single screw under the spout
    • A threaded pipe that screws onto the wall
    • A pop-in pipe that slides onto the wall and locks in place.
  • Step 3: Remove the spout according to its type:
    • If it’s a screw-on, remove the screw then pull out the spout.
    • If it’s threaded, turn it anticlockwise until it comes off.
    • If it’s a pop-on, use a screwdriver or palette knife to gently pry it off the wall.
  • Step 4: Look inside the spout and use a rasp or sandpaper to scrape off any visible dirt or stains. You can also scrape off the dirt using a paste of vinegar and baking soda. Apply the paste onto the dirty parts of the spout, let it sit for half an hour, then rinse it off.
  • Step 5: Fill a metal dish with vinegar and water. It should be enough to completely cover your spout, right up to its base.
  • Step 6: Put the spout inside your vinegar mixture and leave it for three to four days. Once a day, remove the spout and check it, using a rag or old toothbrush to scrape off loose dirt.
  • Step 7: Once it’s spotless, dry it with a clean rag and add some Teflon tape to the tip.
  • Step 8: Put your spout back onto its copper pipe.
  • Step 9: Reconnect your water supply and run your water to see if you’ve fixed the leak.

At this point, you have a shower spout that looks brand new, so if it’s still not working, you may have to throw it out and buy another shower diverter kit.

Option 4 – Replace The Valve Gate

Replace the valve gate

If you’re still having issues, it’s probably time to visit the hardware store. Cheap replacements are easily available and rarely cost more than $50. If you just want the gate, it’s even cheaper.

  • Step 1: Turn off your water using your main bathroom spigot.
  • Step 2: Cover the drain with duct tape. This prevents small faucet bits and screws from going down the drain and getting lost.
  • Step 3: Remove your shower spout from the wall and carry it to the hardware store.
  • Step 4: Ask for a replacement gate valve that fits your shower model.
  • Step 5: Take your replacement valve home and carefully read the instructions.
  • Step 6: Fix your spout back on the wall. This anchors your spout, making it easier to repair.
  • Step 7: Twist the spout so that it faces upward, but don’t remove it from the wall.
  • Step 8: Pry the plastic prongs apart then pull the white bits out of the spout.
  • Step 9: Remove the metal knob from the top of your spout.
  • Step 10: Slip the new shower diverter knob into the top of the spout.
  • Step 11: Being careful not to drop anything, insert the underside portion of the diverter valve. Start with the spring, followed by the black washer.
  • Step 12: Slip the white plastic peg and snap it into place, holding everything together.
  • Step 13: Turn the spout right side up.
  • Step 14: Reconnect your water, and test the diverter.

This option is cheaper than replacing your entire shower spout, but it’s also more complicated. Many people who try this at home still end up with a leaking diverter, so if you want to do it this way, consider having a plumber do it for you.

Option 5 – Replace The Whole Spout

Replace The Whole Spout

This seems drastic, but it’s easier than you think and is the most effective solution. Shower spouts aren’t that expensive. You can get a replacement for as low as $20. Decide whether you want to buy the same model you have or replace it with a universal spout.

  • Step 1: Shut off your water supply and remove your spout from the wall.
  • Step 2: Take it to the hardware store and buy a suitable replacement.
  • Step 3: Bring your new spout home and read the instructions.
  • Step 4: Use vinegar and a soft brush to clean any debris off the copper piping on the bathroom wall. This prevents leakage when you put in your new spout.
  • Step 5: Dry the pipe and put some Teflon tape on its edge. This reduces any potential friction and lowers the chances of leakage.
  • Step 6: Fix the spout onto the wall according to its type. You can push it in, screw it in, or hold it in position and insert the under-spout screw.
  • Step 7: Reconnect your water supply and run the tap to see if it’s still leaking.

 

 

Consider Any Variations

When you noticed your shower diverter wasn’t working as it should, you probably ran to Google and YouTube. And as you may have noticed, most online tutorials use tee-valve diverters in their demos. This is partly because tee-valves are more common than the other two types.

But once in a while, you might find yourself dealing with two-valve or three-valve bathroom spouts, especially in older houses. Luckily, they’re just as easy to fix as a tee-valve shower diverter. You can still soak, lubricate, and replace your two-valve or three-valve.

The main difference is in the piping mechanism. When you remove a tee valve from the wall, you find a single copper pipe. With two valves and three valves, you’ll find the corresponding number of copper pipes. If your shower diverter is a two-valve, focus on the temperature dial.

This is because it often doubles as a shower diverter gate. It controls hot and cold, but it also controls up (to the showerhead) or down (to the spout). On the other hand, if the shower has a three-valve diverter, focus on the middle pipe. That’s where the valve is located.

Repair Your Shower The Easy Way

It’s annoying when you’re trying to have a shower but your bathtub keeps dripping. Or when you’re filling the tub and the rain shower head keeps wetting your back. With a few …

10 Awesome Plumbing Hacks

Calling the pros for every plumbing issue in your home is time-consuming and costly. Now, don’t get us wrong: We love helping our Columbus plumbing customers with problems big and small! But if you’re feeling empowered to DIY your simple plumbing issues, we’re here to help you do that, too. From regular maintenance to clogs […]

Calling the pros for every plumbing issue in your home is time-consuming and costly. Now, don’t get us wrong: We love helping our Columbus plumbing customers with problems big and small! But if you’re feeling empowered to DIY your simple plumbing issues, we’re here to help you do that, too.

From regular maintenance to clogs to leaks, we’ve compiled 10 awesome plumbing hacks that will help you save money and headaches in the long run. 

Hack #1: The Emergency Shut-Off Valve

Let’s say you have an overflowing toilet that just won’t stop or a busted pipe in your basement. Your first step is to shut off the water at the source! Knowing where your emergency shut-off valve is can save you some costly clean-up, water damage, and mold issues.

Hack #2: Garbage Disposal 101

Knowing how to use your garbage disposal correctly helps you avoid repairs and blockages. There are several things you should never put down your disposal:

  • Fibrous foods, like celery, asparagus, or sprouts
  • Fats, oils, and greases
  • Eggshells
  • Coffee grinds
  • Bones
  • Starchy food, like peels, beans, rice, or pasta
  • Non-food items

Hack #3: Clear the Clogs

While we’re talking about disposals, let’s talk about clogs. These steps can help you de-clog your disposal in record time.

  1. Turn off the power, either by unplugging or turning it off at the circuit breaker.
  2. Inspect the disposal with a flashlight. If you see an obvious clog, clear it with any long and sturdy tool. Never use your fingers!
  3. If you don’t see an obvious clog, use a sink plunger. Fill the sink with a few inches of water and start plunging.
  4. Use a DIY drain cleaner. Mix one part baking soda to one part vinegar, and pour the solution down the drain. Wait about 30 minutes, then turn on the hot water for about 60 seconds.
  5. Turn the power back on and test it!

Hack #4: Cleaning Your Disposal

There’s a pretty simple DIY tip for keeping your disposal blades sharp and eliminating those weird smells. Every now and then, put several ice cubes and a hunk of lemon peel down the disposal. Run it without water for about 30 seconds, then run some water and add a little dish soap. You’ll have sharpened blades and a lemony scent in less than a minute!

Hack #5: DIY Drain Cleaner

We can’t stress this enough: Commercial drain cleaners are bad news for your plumbing. They’re too strong and corrode your pipes over time. A DIY cleaner is safer, cheaper, and just as easy. For major clogs, try pouring boiling water down the affected drain, followed by ½ cup baking soda. Let that sit for 5 minutes. Then, pour in a cup of vinegar and wait another 5 minutes. Flush with warm water.

Hack #6: Tackling Toilet Clogs

Your first pro-plumber move for tackling toilet clogs is to have a plunger for every toilet in your home. When you’ve got an overflowing toilet, time is of the essence. You don’t want to be running upstairs for the only plunger in the house!

You can also fix a clogged toilet without a plunger! Stop the flow of water by disconnecting the chain in the tank or by turning off the water at the valve at the back of the toilet. Pour hot water—the hotter the better—into the bowl. Hot water and a little soap can also help break down a clog.

Hack #7: Finding Invisible Leaks

It’s the end of the month, and you’ve received a huuuuuuuge water bill you weren’t expecting. Next, you notice water damage, mold, and poor water pressure. Sounds like you might have a leak… but how can you know for sure?

Finding an invisible leak can be tricky, but it’s definitely not impossible! Turn off all the taps and take a water meter reading. Wait a few hours with nobody using any water, and check the meter again. If it shows water usage, you definitely have a leak somewhere, and need to call in the pros.

Another common place for leaks? The toilet! Try putting food coloring in the tank. If there’s color in the bowl after 30 minutes, you’ve got a leak from the tank!

Hack #8: Ultimate Shower Pressure

Low pressure leads to longer showers, which leads to higher bills. So why not lower your bill and have better pressure—but simply cleaning your shower head? Put a small plastic bag full of white vinegar over your shower head. Secure with a rubber band and leave overnight.

Hack #9: Tighten the Pipes

Threads on your pipes get looser over time, which can lead to small leaks. For a quick DIY pipe tightener:

  1. Turn off the water.
  2. Unscrew the leaky pipes.
  3. Wrap a single-layer of masking tape around the threads.
  4. Screw the pipes back together.

Hack #10: The Leaky Faucet

A leaky tap is the time-old plumbing nightmare. Even though it’s one of the most annoying household problems, a leaky faucet can slip to the very bottom of our to-do lists again and again and again. To stop the constant drip-drip-drip, secure a washcloth around the faucet with a rubber band. Then, when you’re ready to tackle the issue at the source, turn off the water, remove the tap body, put in a new washer or O-ring, and reassemble. Done! The same thing works for leaky pipes, but you’ll want to put a bucket underneath as well.

Want more Columbus plumbing tips?

We love helping you with your plumbing problems, big and small. Give us a call today for more plumbing tips and tricks!…

Helpful Plumbing Maintenance Tips for Homeowners

Plumbing repairs average $175 to $450, but major plumbing issues can cost a lot more. Taking care of your plumbing can prevent common issues, such as leaks and clogged drains, that require you to call a plumber. Most of the plumbing maintenance tasks are simple enough for anyone to handle on their own.

Doing regular plumbing maintenance can keep you from needing to do a quick “plumbers near me” search for an emergency plumber. When it gets to the point of needing emergency repairs, you’re likely looking at water damage and a lot higher price tag on your repair bill. Preventing issues and catching them early is key.

Keep reading to learn about the plumbing maintenance tasks you should be doing.

Look for Water Leaks

Faucet with a Water Leak

Leaks account for almost 1 trillion gallons of wasted water each year in the United States. On average, a household with leaks can waste almost 10,000 gallons of water. Finding and fixing those leaks protects natural resources and can save you on your water bills.

One way to see if your home has a leak somewhere is to stop using water for one to two hours. Look at your water meter before and after that period. Changes in the meter mean that water is still running somewhere, which likely means you have a leak.

You can inspect any visible plumbing components for leaks at any time. Check faucets and any exposed pipes, such as those under sinks and in unfinished areas, such as basements and crawl spaces. Look for signs of water below the pipes, such as puddles or mold.

In finished areas, leaks often aren’t easy to spot until you notice water stains on walls or ceilings. You might also see or smell mold or mildew from the excess moisture.

Leaks often happen where pipes connect, so look at those areas especially close. Faucets often leak when the washers and gaskets inside wear out. If you discover a leak, call a plumber to have the problem fixed properly if it’s not something minor that you can handle yourself.

Don’t forget to look for leaks in and around your appliances that use water, including dishwashers, washing machines, and refrigerators with built-in icemakers and water dispensers. It could be a simple connection issue or a leaking hose that needs to be replaced. Hoses eventually deteriorate and can develop cracks.

While you’re looking for leaks, check out the condition of the pipes and hoses in your home. Components can corrode or crack over time. Even if they’re not leaking yet, they could be close to leaking if they show signs of deterioration.

Check for Toilet Leaks

Toilets are often the cause of leaks in homes. An easy way to check for toilet leaks is to put a few drops of food coloring in your toilet tank. Give it an hour or two.

Check the bowl of the toilet to see if the food coloring has made its way into the water there. If so, you have a leak. An easy way to fix this is by replacing the flush seal that you can buy at any home improvement store.

Check Shut-Off Valves

Customer Turning Off Valve During Plumbing Maintenance

All home plumbing systems have shut-off valves to kill the water supply. These shut-off valves are crucial if you have a plumbing emergency or major leak. You can turn off the water supply before your entire home becomes flooded.

Your home has a main shut-off valve, often where the water supply comes into your home. You can use it to shut off all of the water to the home.

Individual plumbing fixtures, such as toilets and sinks, also usually have their own shut-off valves. This lets you cut the water to just that fixture if you need to do maintenance on it or the leak is confined to that area.

As part of your yearly plumbing maintenance, look for all of the shut-off valves in your home so you know where they’re located in case of a plumbing emergency. Test each of the valves to ensure they turn easily and work properly. If they don’t turn, don’t work, or leak when you turn them, call a plumber to have the parts repaired or replaced.

Test the Water Pressure

If you have a sudden drop in water pressure, you likely notice it right away. This can be due to large demand from other faucets, or it could be due to a plumbing issue. Most homes have a pressure regulating valve that can fail over time or can have debris inside of it. This valve regulates water pressure coming from the street pipes and reduces the water pressure to a safe level for your home.

However, the water pressure can slowly decrease over time, due to things such as corroded or clogged pipes and buildup in your faucet heads. If you notice lower pressure in just one faucet, look for clogs in those specific areas. If you can’t find the cause of the lower water pressure, have a plumber inspect the system for you.

Inspect Your Water Heater

Flushing Water Heater For Plumbing Maintenance

A major plumbing fixture that you want to keep running is your water heater. While you might not feel comfortable messing around with the water heater too much, you can look for signs that it’s getting older or has an issue that needs to be repaired.

Start by looking at the floor around the water heater to check for puddles and leaks. Check the pipes and the unit for additional leaking or moisture. Rusting and strange noises, such as rattling or banging, coming from the unit can also be a sign of an issue.

If you have a traditional tank water heater, draining it once per year can help remove sediments. The sediments force the water heater to work harder, which raises your energy bills and can shorten the life of your water heater. If you don’t feel comfortable draining the water heater yourself, schedule a yearly plumbing maintenance visit with your plumber to handle the task and look for other issues.

Insulate Plumbing Components

Insulation on exposed parts of your plumbing system can help protect them and allow them to work more efficiently. Insulating your exposed pipes, especially those in cold areas or near exterior walls, can prevent the water from freezing. Insulation on your hot water pipes helps keep the water heated by preventing heat loss, which can lower your utility bills.

Foam pipe wrap or pipe sleeves fit perfectly around the pipes for easy installation. The sleeves have a slit along one side to slip over the pipes easily. Use duct tape to secure the sleeves.

Insulating your water heater can increase its energy efficiency. If your water heater tank feels warm to the touch, insulation can reduce standby heat loss by 25 to 45%. Water heater insulating blankets easily wrap around the tank for quick insulation.

Limit What You Put Down Drains

When it comes to drains, the only things you should let go down them are water and soap. Even soaps can cause the drains to get clogged over time and regular cleaning.

Sometimes debris can slip past you and down the drain. Hair is often a cause of clogs in shower drains. Putting a drain cover in your shower can stop hair and other items from falling down the drain.

Never flush anything extra down the toilet other than toilet paper. Feminine hygiene products, paper towels, cotton balls, and any other debris items can back up the plumbing and cause overflowing toilets. A clogged toilet can require a visit from an emergency plumber to get things flowing again.

Use Your Garbage Disposal Properly

Garbage disposals make life a lot easier, but they can quickly become a plumbing headache if you don’t use them properly. Not all food is safe to put down the garbage disposal. Many food items can damage the garbage disposal or cause it to back up.

Avoid certain foods in the garbage disposal, including:

  • Grease and fat that can congeal
  • Pasta, bread, rice, and similar starchy items that expand when wet
  • Coffee grounds
  • Bones, shells, and other hard objects
  • Nuts, seeds, and pits
  • Tough meat
  • Food with membranes, such as onion layers and eggshells
  • Potato peels
  • Stringy and fibrous items
  • Non-food items

If you’re unsure about whether or not an item can go in the garbage disposal, throw it in the trash instead to be on the safe side. At the least, many items dull the blades, which makes your garbage disposal ineffective. At worst, you can completely destroy the appliance or clog it, making the sink unusable until you get an emergency plumber to fix the problem.

Clean Your Shower Head

Clean Showerhead Spraying Water

Showerheads can get clogged with minerals from water, especially if your area has hard water. The blocked holes in the showerhead reduce pressure and can be hard on the plumbing system.

Carefully remove the showerhead and place it in a container of vinegar to soak. You can also fill a bag with vinegar and secure …

Plumbing Drawings

Plumbing drawings provide all pertinent information on the design of the plumbing system for a project, including line sizes and location, fixture location, isolation valves, storage-tank capacities, hot-water-heater capacities and locations, and drain locations and routing. Plumbing systems involve two major components, water supply and drainage. Water is supplied under pressure through pipes to plumbing fixtures. Drainage works by gravity: Drain pipes must slope downward. Vent pipes are required. A plumbing floor plan will typically show the location and type of plumbing fixtures, as well as the route pipes will be run (overhead or through walls) for potable water, drainage, waste, and vents. Plumbing drawings are usually numbered beginning with “P,” as in P-1, P-2, etc.

The first component connected to a fixture is a trap. Traps are located at every fixture. A trap is the u-shaped pipe found below a sink. Some traps are part of the design of the fixture and are not visible, as in a toilet or double sink. The trap catches and holds a small quantity of water to provide a seal. This seal prevents gases from the sewage system entering the building.

From the trap sewage travels through drainage pipes in branch lines to a vertical stack. A soil stack carries waste from toilets. A waste stack carries the other waste from a sink, washing machine, or dishwasher. All drainage pipes must be connected to vents. Vents are open to the outside air. Vents allow built-up sewage gases to escape and pressure in the system to equalize. Figure 6.19 shows a schematic isometric of a two-bath plumbing system and the various connections and outlets needed.

Plumbing drawings are typically part of the construction-drawing set. In most cases, they are submitted with the construction drawings for a building-permit application. They are also part of the package for pricing the project for the client. They are used for construction. All related plumbing lines; drains, connections, and vents must be installed according to the approved drawings.

A mechanical-engineering company produces the drawings. They must comply with the National Plumbing Code and with national, provincial, and local codes.

Engineers produce their own drawings. They are based on plans provided by the interior designer or architect. These plans show the engineer the location of plumbing fixtures such as toilets, sinks, and water heaters in the design. Some projects require piping for equipment as well.

Generally, the engineer draws a plumbing plan and connection diagrams. Typical diagrams are of the water-supply system and the sanitary stack. Legends, schedules, and notes specific to the project are added. On small projects, there are usually only a few fixtures, a sink and a toilet. In this case, the required information is included on the mechanical-drawing sheets. For large or complex designs, the plan(s), diagrams, notes, etc., are on separate sheets. Several sheets may be required to cover all the information. Figure 6.20 shows a plumbing and sprinkler layout plan.

The engineer’s drawings must provide information regarding the connections to the main water and sanitary sewer lines. The layout of any existing and new piping is indicated on the plan. The size for all lines for water, sanitary, and venting must be noted. The hookup to the water meter, new or existing, is covered, and the type, size, and location of the water heater are specified.

The following are typically included in a set of plumbing drawings

  • A plan with lines and symbols representing all piping
  • Symbol legend, general notes, and specific key notes
  • Fixture schedule, specifying the manufacturer and model for each item
  • The sizes for all piping, cold/hot water, sanitary, vent lines, etc.
  • Diagrams, such as water riser and sanitary stack
  • Information regarding the water heater

Other information may be needed, depending on the complexity of the project

  • Details drawings, such as water heater, water meter connection, or floor drains
  • Diagrams or details referencing special equipment requirements
  • Fire-protection notes
  • Fire-sprinkler notes and symbols
  • Special-air lines
  • Natural-gas lines

Plumbing Fixture Schedule

Isometric diagram of a two-bath plumbing system.

Isometric Piping Symbols Chart

Isometric piping diagrams of hot- and cold-water riser systems.

Engineer’s drawings are required for all commercial projects involving any plumbing work. This applies to additions, renovations, or new construction. A permit is required prior to commencing any work on site.

Building codes specify the number of toilets, urinals, and lavatories required in a building or space, based on the occupancy type. In many cases the facilities must be designed as accessible for the disabled as discussed in Chapter 11. The designer, architect, and engineer must comply with all codes when producing their final drawings.

Plumbing Plans For House Vic

Floor plan showing plumbing and sprinkler layout.

Drawings and permits are also needed for residential projects when substantial plumbing work is to take place. For small projects, a licensed plumber can submit the information required to obtain a permit.

A professional engineer also provides the required drawings and reports for a septic-tank installation. A sewage permit must be obtained. A septic tank is installed where a sanitary sewage connection to a municipal treatment facility is not possible.

Concept and designs are the first stage of any project. When established, the next stage is construction drawings. Once a floor plan is complete, it is passed over to the mechanical engineer to produce plumbing drawings. The drawings become part of the construction-drawing set.

In some residences and commercial structures, a separate plumbing plan is drawn to show fixtures, water-supply and waste-disposal lines, equipment, and other supply and disposal sources. These isometric drawings are much easier to understand and are invaluable to those responsible for preparing material estimates and to the craftspeople responsible for installing plumbing systems. The mechanical division of a set of construction drawings will include, in addition to plumbing plans and details, drawings for any heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning systems that a building might contain. Frequently, the drawing sheets in the mechanical division are identified by the designating letter M in the title block. However, remember that in the order of drawings, sheets containing heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning drawings will precede those for plumbing.

Contact us for more information.…

Plumbing Basics

Plumbing follows the basic laws of nature — gravity, pressure, water seeking its own level. Knowing this, you can understand its “mysteries” and make dozens of fixes to your home’s plumbing system. You can save yourself time, trouble, and money!

The plumbing system in your home is composed of two separate subsystems. One subsystem brings freshwater in, and the other takes wastewater out. The water that comes into your home is under pressure. It enters your home under enough pressure to allow it to travel upstairs, around corners, or wherever else it’s needed. As water comes into your home, it passes through a meter that registers the amount you use. The main water shutoff, or stop, valve is typically located close to the meter. In a plumbing emergency, it’s vital that you quickly close the main shutoff valve. Otherwise, when a pipe bursts, it can flood your house in no time. If the emergency is confined to a sink, tub, or toilet, however, you may not want to turn off your entire water supply. Therefore, most fixtures should have individual stop valves.

Water from the main supply is immediately ready for your cold water needs. The hot water supply, however, requires another step. One pipe carries water from the cold water system to your water heater. From the heater, a hot water line carries the heated water to all the fixtures, out-lets, and appliances that require hot water. A thermostat on the heater maintains the temperature you select by turning the device’s heating elements on and off as required. The normal temperature setting for a home water heater is between 140 degrees F and 160 degrees F, but 120 degrees F is usually adequate and is also more economical. Some automatic dishwashers require higher temperature water, though many of these have a water heater within them that boosts the temperature another 20 degrees F.

Drainage Systems

Some sink traps have a clean-out plug that enables you to clean the trap without having to remove it from the drain.
Some sink traps have a clean-out plug that enables you to clean the trap without having to remove it from the drain.
©2006 PUBLICATIONS INTERNATIONAL, LTD.

Whether your home is on a sewer or septic system, the systems within your home are essentially the same. Drainage systems do not depend on pressure, as supply systems do. Instead, waste matter leaves your house because the drainage pipes all pitch, or angle, downward. Gravity pulls the waste along. The sewer line continues this downward flow to a sewage treatment facility or a septic tank.

While the system sounds simple, there’s more to it, including vents, traps, and clean outs. The vents sticking up from the roof of your house allow air to enter the drainpipes. If there were no air supply coming from the vents, wastewater would not flow out properly and the water in the traps would need to be siphoned away.

Traps are vital components of the drainage system. You can see a trap under every sink. It is the curved or S-shape section of pipe under a drain. Water flows from the basin with enough force to go through the trap and out through the drainpipe, but enough water stays in the trap afterward to form a seal that prevents sewer gas from backing up into your home. Every fixture must have a trap. Toilets are self-trapped and don’t require an additional trap at the drain. Bathtubs frequently have drum traps, not only to form a seal against sewer gas but also to collect hair and dirt in order to prevent clogged drains. Some kitchen sinks have grease traps to collect grease that might otherwise cause clogging. Because grease and hair are generally the causes of drain clogs, traps often have clean-out plugs that give you easier access to remove or break up any blockage.

Since a drainage system involves all of these components, it is usually referred to as the DWV: the drain-waste-vent system. If water is to flow out freely and waste is to exit properly, all components of the DWV must be present and in good working order. Examine the pipes in the basement or crawl space under your house to help you understand the system better.

Supply and Drainage Subsystems

Fixtures should have individual supply shutoff valves so that you don't need to close the main shutoff to make repairs at the fixture.
Fixtures should have individual supply shutoff valves so that you don’t need to close the main shutoff to make repairs at the fixture.
©2006 PUBLICATIONS INTERNATIONAL, LTD.

The supply and drainage subsystems are two distinct operations, with no overlapping between them. There are bridges between the two, however, and the bridges are what make the plumbing system worth having. In plumbing jargon, any bridge between the supply and drainage systems is a fixture.

Toilets, sinks, and tubs are fixtures. In addition, an outside faucet is a fixture and so is a washing machine. All devices that draw freshwater and discharge wastewater are fixtures, and all are designed to keep the supply and drainage systems strictly segregated.

Some fixtures have individual supply shutoff valves so you don’t need to close the main shutoff to repair them. It’s a good idea to make sure everyone in the family knows the location of the main shutoff valve in your house as well as how to use it. You may want to tag the main shutoff valve so anyone can easily find it.

Before you embark on any plumbing repairs, always turn off the water supply to the fixture or the main shutoff. In addition, check with your local plumbing code official before you add or change any pipe in your house. You will learn what is allowed and what is prohibited and whether or not a homeowner is allowed to do his or her own work. If you get the green light, you can save yourself a lot of money by doing your own repairs.

Five Advantages of Plumbing Maintenance That Will Make Your Life Easier

Five Advantages of Plumbing Maintenance That Will Make Your Life Easier

With everything you have going on in your life, it can be easy to ignore your plumbing. After all, as long as there are no leaks and everything is moving as it should, it’s fine–right? Actually, regular maintenance on your plumbing can make your life MUCH easier. Consider these benefits to scheduling a regular maintenance service from Ford’s Plumbing and Heating.

Better Water Pressure
Good water pressure is a wonderful thing and you may not even notice that you’ve lost pressure until things become REALLY bad. Regular maintenance will assure you have that water pressure you need to take a nice, relaxing shower after work.

Healthier Family
Mold and mildew cause health problems. By working regularly with a plumber, you can avoid having these substances enter your home through the pipes.

Less Chance of Emergency Repair
Plumbing emergencies require emergency service. This can be expensive and stressful. If you regularly maintain your system you’ll be much less likely to face an emergency repair in the future.

Save Money on Utilities
A well-maintained plumbing system will create less waste–saving you money on your monthly water bill.

Improve Value
When you have taken care of all repairs and maintained the plumbing system, you obviously care for the home. This will be reflected in your selling price one day when the time comes to move elsewhere.

We would love for you to avoid the hassle of calling an emergency plumber in Los Angeles. Schedule your maintenance service with Ford’s Plumbing and Heating today. We look forward to working with you!…

5 Severe Weather Preparation Tips for Your Florida Home

Mike Williams
, November 25, 2019, Plumbing Tips, Florida, inspection, plumbing, water heater,
0
Clearing autumn gutter in rain blocked by leaves with hand to improve pumbling
While Floridians typically don’t have to sustain frigid winters as others do in other parts of the country, they do have unique severe weather conditions. As a homeowner here, you know you’ll occasionally have to prepare for rainy seasons, heavy storms, and damaging winds. One aspect of your home that specifically requires attention is your plumbing. Today, we’ll highlight five severe weather preparation tips to make sure your plumbing-related components are ready for inclement weather.

Keep Gutters & Drains Free of Debris
Your gutters and drains are designed to channel water away from your home and structure. It may seem like a basic suggestion for severe weather preparation, but clearing your drains and spouts can reduce the risk of access water coming into your home.

Properly Test & Maintain Your Sump Pump
If you have a basement, chances are you also have a sump pump. Don’t wait until your space is sloshing with water to learn your pump isn’t working. Be sure to test and properly maintain the unit before any incoming storms.

Turn Off Your Water
If you are preparing for extreme weather, tropical storm, or hurricane-related, go ahead and turn your water off at the main. This may help prevent damage should any of your pipes burst or be damaged.

Protect the Water Heater
Replacing a water heater can sometimes be costly. Do your best to protect your water heater prior to potential weather conditions. It should be elevated off the ground already, but you may put reinforcements around it to keep water from reaching the unit itself. Be mindful, should you be turning off your water main, it may have an adverse effect on your water heater. Some units can be damaged if the water is off for long periods of time.

Inspection Before & After the Storm
One of the best severe weather preparation actions is to get professional inspections. It’s usually a smart idea to do a walkthrough of your home before a storm hits. You can take pictures of valuables and conditions, as documentation. After the weather has passed, inspect your plumbing and property again to identify any potential damage.

If you need help preparing your plumbing before inclement weather, contact us! We offer a friendly voice, licensed plumbing technicians, and 24/7 availability.…

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Vivamus vestibulum metus mauris, at maximus purus scelerisque in. Nulla facilisi. Praesent arcu enim, interdum vel faucibus tempor, sodales nec eros. Curabitur molestie felis non tellus ullamcorper sagittis eu id metus. In gravida ex vel ante mattis, quis ultrices purus tincidunt. Morbi lacus dolor, sagittis et ante a, porta varius lectus. Nunc convallis ante ut mauris posuere, a dignissim metus eleifend. Cras posuere quam eu velit volutpat, posuere ullamcorper diam tristique. Sed ullamcorper tellus tortor, ut pellentesque erat efficitur non.

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Vivamus vestibulum metus mauris, at maximus purus scelerisque in. Nulla facilisi. Praesent arcu enim, interdum vel faucibus tempor, sodales nec eros. Curabitur molestie felis non tellus ullamcorper sagittis eu id metus. In gravida ex vel ante mattis, quis ultrices purus tincidunt. Morbi lacus dolor, sagittis et ante a, porta varius lectus. Nunc convallis ante ut mauris posuere, a dignissim metus eleifend. Cras posuere quam eu velit volutpat, posuere ullamcorper diam tristique. Sed ullamcorper tellus tortor, ut pellentesque erat efficitur non.

Fusce erat nunc, molestie et arcu eu, feugiat efficitur odio. Donec ullamcorper eros eu luctus tempus. Interdum et malesuada fames ac ante ipsum primis in faucibus. Nullam volutpat sed est sed vehicula. Vestibulum ipsum nulla, eleifend sit amet libero ut, mollis tempus augue. Quisque in diam in mauris ullamcorper cursus non at risus. Integer eu sodales ex. Nulla convallis elit vel massa scelerisque, nec aliquam neque aliquam.…